CPD Workshops

“Stop doing that!” – Understanding the “aggressive” play of children

We talk a lot about the best way to tackle “aggressive play” in children, particularly boys. Despite attempts to limit or ban this type of play children can often be found endlessly challenging each other with themes inspired by personal experience , the news, computer games, films and television. As adults working with children we often feel compelled to explain, limit or ban this type of play in the fear it spirals out of control and somebody gets hurt.

In this workshop we will explore what is meant by “aggressive” play and consider whether or not the word aggressive is the right way to describe this important developmental play stage learning about big body play, touch, establishing personal boundaries, negotiating rules, conflict resolution and developing emotional resilience.

NOTE: this workshop does not cover how to manage physical violence with the intent to do harm.

 

Cost:

£95 - If you would like to book please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Dates/times:

Saturday 7th December 2019

9.30am – 15.30pm

With Kids, 15 Annfield Place, Glasgow, G31 2XE (tbc)

 

Friday 17th January 2020

9.30am – 15.30pm

Wester Hailes Healthy Living Centre, 30 Harvesters Way, Edinburgh, E14 3JF (tbc)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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